Search the archive

139 RESULTS

UBC's newest startup venture is looking to break into the tech world. HATCH, a lab and office space designed to foster technology and social ventures as they bring their products to market, was recently launched at UBC.

You’re racing down Main Mall on your bike, weaving in and out of the hordes of students, trying to make it to your next class on time. You might want to rethink how fast you ride. A new study looks at how air pollution and biking speed.

From delivering packages for Amazon to being mounted with a chainsaw, drones have been put to some creative uses. One UBC researcher has been using them for a slightly more scholarly purpose — studying bowhead whales in the Canadian Arctic.

You’re an early-career scientist — a UBC undergraduate sitting in HEBB 100 or a graduate student thrown into an unfamiliar field — and your state of perpetual confusion stands in sharp contrast to your competent, confident mentors.

Halloween — like Vine — may officially be over, but science is carries on never sleeping. Here are a few things UBC researchers have done while you were out trick-or-treating in your glorious, last-minute, broke-university-student-centric costumes.

The Temporary Energy Centre — better known as the carbon box — is a lot like viewing a sports car car — it looks amazing from the outside but you have no idea what’s happening on the inside. So, what's going on inside?

It’s probably not a good idea to take a baseball bat to grandma when methods such as quarantine could prove more effective in controlling the infected. Speakers talked about how to identify, manage and model an outbreak if the undead were to rise.

The team think your phone could prescribe you drugs in the not-so-distant future. By taking a sample of your saliva, it may be one day possible to differentiate the drugs that will cure you from the ones that will kill you.

Somewhere, deep within the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, there are giant robotic arms at work. While unsuspecting student study the robot is busy moving books, maps, records and more — going largely unnoticed by students.

Previous Page 3 of 10 Next