Alex Nguyen

Print News Editor

Alex started contributing to The Ubyssey in October 2016 after accidentally writing a long-form — and a few breaking news, election seasons and features later, she has not looked back since. She is interested in university governance and affordability, while dabbling in data journalism and photography as ways to expand story-telling. Occasionally, she studies political science.

173 RESULTS

It’s a familiar sight at the root of food insecurity: between paying ever-increasing tuition and rent, students have little money left to buy food — a situation that is reality across Canadian universities.

As food insecurity looms large at UBC, campus groups are actively trying to create a safety net for those falling through the hunger gap.

Food insecurity — defined broadly as unreliable access to sufficiently nutritious food — impacts students at UBC in deeper ways than eating cup ramen. It is also hardly rare.

While the society has consistently pushed back against tuition hikes beyond the two per cent domestic cap — such as international tuition raises — because of its affordability policy, it is also now advocating against increases within the cap.

Page 1 of 12 Next