Study Tips

You can do it, we believe in you

Studying is different for everybody. Some people are naturals at it, while others may struggle a bit (or a lot).

First year is the year you actually have to learn how to study — you can’t sail through and get straight-A’s like many of us did in high school. Make sure you try out different ways of active studying, whether it’s re-writing your notes, condensing them, making flashcards or quizzing yourself or a friend.

Different strategies work better for different subjects, so once you find your rhythm go from there. Having trouble? Check-in with your TA, your classmates or your prof to see how they suggest you prepare, and always, always, do the practice problems! You may just get lucky and find one of them on the test.

“It is important to know yourself. How long will it take you to complete this assignment? How well do you understand the material for this quiz? Will doing a single practice test suffice, or must you also review all past assignments?”

— Maria Sottile

Top Study Spaces

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre: Home to the “Harry Potter Room,” IKB is also where the most public study spaces are. While IKB isn’t the quietest place, there are designated silent study areas.

Koerner Library: Koerner is a silent study space so make sure you’re not taking your group study sessions here. Check out the Stacks to find individual study spaces - and books if you’re interested in that kind of thing.

Woodward Library: The biggest Science library on campus also gives you a less busy space to study.

Forest Sciences Centre: If you can find a spot, this is a gorgeous place to study. The wooden decor and greenery are sure to be a good boost to your mood.

The Nest: While we loved the Old SUB (RIP), the Nest has a ton more study space and a bunch more light. You’re right by all of the food you can want, which makes it ideal for longer study sessions.

The Asian Library: One of the numerous smaller libraries around campus, the Asian Library offers one of the calmest places to study on campus.

“Make small study groups with your classmates, find an empty classroom (preferably with a whiteboard and a projector), and explain stuff you learnt in class to each other.”

— Rohit Chandel

Pick one