Two looks good on you, Ubyssey Science

In October 2015, we launched Ubyssey Science. Here’s our mandatory, self-congratulatory post about the coolest things we’ve done in our second year.

We continued to publish on science/research happening on campus, science related events in Vancouver, science/tech topics trending worldwide (with a UBC expert's take) and evidence-based tips for UBCers in the midst of midterm funks.

The section highlighted UBC profs and students behind important discoveries. They’ve shared a few standout phrases about the process of science-ing: “That’s pretty cool”, “Let’s try...”, “But what’s the point?”, “I don’t know!”, “You’re kidding me,” and “It's very humbling.”

We’ve learned that while science itself is an objective endeavor, scientists are pretty opinionated.

The section saw over 90,000 unique page views in the last year — so what were people reading?

On the cover

Science stories featured on the cover of The Ubyssey.

Ada’s Atlantic adventure

How a UBC engineering team's pride and joy ended up lost in the Atlantic, but united a community across the world.
How a UBC engineering team's pride and joy ended up lost in the Atlantic, but united a community across the world. Aiken Lao

Ada, the little robot, was in trouble. We found out more.

Tip of the iceberg

First things first — contraceptives prevent pregnancy, but don’t necessarily protect against disease.
First things first — contraceptives prevent pregnancy, but don’t necessarily protect against disease. File Joshua Medicoff

Condoms and pills may not be your best bet for contraceptives at university.

Which Doctor

"When you start legislating on the basis of inclusivity and diversity, it becomes problematic because people can’t make an informed decision.”
"When you start legislating on the basis of inclusivity and diversity, it becomes problematic because people can’t make an informed decision.” Jerry Yin

On how to make the right choice in Vancouver’s crowded healthcare industry — spoiler, crystal therapy is not a good option.

$42 Million of federal funding to provide ‘absolutely essential’ support for UBC science and engineering

Nicole Jenni, Rickey Yada and Patricia Schulte, from left to right.
Nicole Jenni, Rickey Yada and Patricia Schulte, from left to right. Jordan Byrum

Funding is meaningful at all levels — for graduate students, established professors and deans alike.

Most-read stories of the year

Professor wins award for equation that is beyond its time

"Very often society tells us the stereotypical mathematician doesn’t look like me."
"Very often society tells us the stereotypical mathematician doesn’t look like me." File Koby Michaels

A female mathematician peeks into the future with her quasi Schur equations.

Shrooms 101: a beginner's guide to magic mushrooms

Be safe!
Be safe! File Nicole Del Negro

Don’t be a goob. Get yourself a sitter and don’t try them when you’re stressed.

UBC student Ann Makosinski named to Forbes 30 Under 30 list

Makosinski in her dorm room in 2016.
Makosinski in her dorm room in 2016. File Jeremy Johnson-Silvers

In case you need a reminder that you’re a talentless pit, read about this amazing young student who incorporated her company — Makotronics Enterprises — in October 2016 after her 19th birthday.

UBC students win three of five STEM Spotlight awards

Ryan Hirakida won the transportation award for his idea which could potentially eliminate much of the waiting time involved in travelling with BC Ferries.
Ryan Hirakida won the transportation award for his idea which could potentially eliminate much of the waiting time involved in travelling with BC Ferries. File Choladhorn Sinrachtanant

Lol @ SFU.

Coffee does more than give you energy

coffee! It serves as a stimulant for the brain, a social-situation starter and as perhaps a lesser known fact, a stimulant for the other end...
coffee! It serves as a stimulant for the brain, a social-situation starter and as perhaps a lesser known fact, a stimulant for the other end... File Joshua Medicoff

Yeah it makes you poo, too. ;)

Finally, here’s a reminder that science has ethical consequences. So remember to resist locally! And let us (science@ubyssey.ca) know what kind of science and tech articles you’d like to see in the future.